Month: October 2011

How to Teach Proper Oral-Nasal Resonance Balance

By Shanti McGinley

This opinion paper was originally posted as a downloadable PDF on my website’s resources page. I am slowly formatting the articles over there for posting to this blog. This post was authored in mid- 2011. Download the original PDF here. *** How to Teach Proper Oral-Nasal Resonance Balance I receive weekly questions from therapists struggling with how to decrease hypernasality in clients who have adequate velo-pharyngeal structure. I am not an expert in this area, but I would like to…

Carryover Techniques for Speech-Language Therapy

By Shanti McGinley

This opinion paper was originally posted as a downloadable PDF on my website’s resources page. I am slowly formatting the articles over there for posting to this blog. This post was authored in mid- 2011. Download the original PDF here. *** Carryover Techniques The term carryover refers to a client’s ability to take an individual speech skill learned in the therapy room and to apply it broadly in all speaking situations. The following is an outline of the techniques presented…

Starting Position for Speech Movement

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I am working on my master’s thesis on a topic related to the basis of articulation and the neutral/starting positions. I would like to expand my research beyond the linguistics domain into the neighboring fields of speed physiology and therapy. I read your notes “The Roles of Oral Rest Posture and Neutral Position in Articulation” and would like to cite it. Have you published it anywhere? Perhaps you have mentioned starting position in your other publications? I am currently…

Inappropriate Prolongation of R

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My student can do R in all words and in all positions, but he prolongs it. Do I need to teach him NOT to do this? I would teach it to him if it did not go away by itself within a reasonable period of time.  I am not sure what that reasonable period of time is, but I would be willing to give him 6 months to a year to straighten this out. I probably would give him…

Co-articulation and Vocalic “Er”

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My client can say “Er” in words like “flower” when we split the syllables apart: “Flow—er.” But he cannot say it in words like “Bird” or “Shirt.” What can we do? You will notice that you have split “flower” in to syllables like this: “Flow—-Er.” This means that although your client can say “Er,” he cannot sequence from the C to “Er.”  We don’t say, “Flow—er.”  We say, “Flah—wer.” The /r/ occurs in a CVC, and this requires better…

Incomplete Evacuation of Food

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I have a three-year-old male client who is beginning to talk. He is a very picky eater and rarely eats at school, although he has started eating a few bites of pear, apple, or fish crackers for me.  He bites, lateralizes, and chews, but then he leaves the food smashed all over between his teeth and lips.  Can you tell me why he may be doing this? How I can help him with creating a bolus and swallowing? He…

“Pencil Talking” for Rate Control

By Shanti McGinley

Q: Do you have any suggestions for slowing the rate of speech in an elementary school child? Rate is all about the number of syllables produced per unit of time.  Therefore focus on syllables.  This is what I do.  I call it “Pencil Talking”–– The child and I each hold a pencil with a good eraser.  We engage in general conversation, or we talk about speech.  We tap our erasers on the table to mark each syllable as we talk….

R and Diphthongs

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My client can produce R in all kinds of words, but he still sounds funny on words like “Player” and “Hour.” Can you help with this? I have not heard your client, of course, but the word examples you gave make me think that he may be having trouble with R after diphthongs. Phoneticians tell us that the presence of a diphthong actually causes a glide to be inserted, and your client may not be doing that.  This is…

Sanitizing the Tools of Articulation Therapy

By Shanti McGinley

Q: We are wondering about hygiene and the use of tools in articulation therapy. What are the practices you use to keep your multiple-use tools sanitary from client to client? Guidelines Adhere to the following sanitary guidelines when handling objects that are used in, on, or around the mouth: Wood, paper, cardboard, sponge, cotton, leather, or hemp objects should be used once and then discarded. Dental floss also should be used once and then discarded. Plastic, rubber, vinyl, metal, and…

Epenthesis for Final C’s

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My daughter is 31 months old. She speaks in single words and uses single syllables. She leaves off the endings off words. I have been teaching final sounds to her, and now she says them, but she separates them from the rest of the word. For example, she says “uh—puh” for “up.” What should I do now? Ooo- No worries. You are on the right track! If she is saying final consonants as a second syllable, THIS IS GOOD. She…