Tag: Orofacial Myology

Does an SLP Need a Background in Orofacial Myology?

By Pam Marshalla

Q: Do SLP’s need a background in orofacial myofunctional therapy? I am not a certified orofacial myologist, but I have taken many seminars on the topic. I attend their conventions periodically, and I read and have written for the IAOM Journal. I have found that concepts from orofacial myofunctional therapy have been very useful to me as another way to gain a broad perspective of oral movements. Throughout my career I have combined concepts from orofacial myology, feeding development and therapy, and…

Strength vs. Motor Patterns — The Nitty Gritty

By Pam Marshalla

Q: I was at the IAOM convention in the fall of 2013, and I heard you speak on oral stability. You used your hands to describe the difference between oral strength and oral movement patterns. Can you post it here? I would like to share it with my colleagues and I can’t remember what you said. This is probably the best way I have discovered to describe the difference between movement patterns and strength of movement. Hand Movement vs. Hand…

Kinesio Tape in Speech Therapy

By Pam Marshalla

Q: I see kids in a school setting. My 3-year-old client has a private SLP who is using kinesio tape on his mouth to help improve lip closure and resting posture. I had not yet heard of this technique but I am intrigued. I would love to know your opinion regarding this method. Some traditional SLPs placed tape on the side of the lips to signal the client that he was moving them instead of his tongue*.  You see it…

Help for Adult with Articulation and Feeding Problems

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I am an SLP with a lisp and mild problems with chewing and swallowing. I receive SL services as a child, but I quit too early and have not completely remediated my errors. What would you recommend? I would recommend that you find an SLP who is trained in orofacial myology to oversee your work on speech, eating, swallowing, and probably oral rest.  An orofacial myofunctional therapist who knows what s/he is doing would be of great help to…

Mobius Syndrome and Articulation Therapy

By Shanti McGinley

Q: What type of articulation therapy should be provided for children with Mobius Syndrome? I have only seen a few children with Mobius Syndrome, and those were seen for diagnosis only. As I understand it, facial paralysis is the main problem and the paralysis can involve some or all of the facial muscles, particularly the upper lip in most cases. The breadth and scope of the paralysis will guide speech involvement.  One client I saw had paralysis only in the…

Tongue Thrust Following the Swallow

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My friend’s daughter has a tongue thrust (the tongue pushes forward after the swallow). The orthodontist gave her one technique–– holding gum on the roof of her mouth while she swallows. Do you have any other ideas for tongue thrust techniques for a very typically developing 2nd grader? First a few words about the general nature of this question:  Asking someone for ideas about teaching a correct swallow is like asking someone for techniques to fix an articulation error. …

Tongue Thrust References

By Shanti McGinley

Q: What do you recommend to begin doing reading on tongue thrust? In terms of textbooks, I would recommend either of the following.  The chapters about what to do in therapy for tongue thrust are basically the same in both of these books: Hanson, M. L., & Barrett, R. H. (1988) Fundamentals of orofacial myology. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas. Hanson, M. L., & Mason, R. M. (2003) Orofacial Myology: International Perspectives. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas.

“Gummy Smile”

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I have a new referral from a dentist for a client with a “gummy smile.” Haven’t seen him yet. What do you think this means? I would assume that the term “gummy smile” means that the upper lip is retracted and the upper gums are exposed.  Assuming that this is the case, the client needs to learn normal oral rest posture.  Normal oral rest consists of the lips resting gently together, the teeth resting a few millimeters apart, and…

Exposed Upper Teeth

By Shanti McGinley

Q: One of my high school students has a tense upper lip, which interferes with correct productions of P, B, and M, although she can produce labials in structured tasks.  She also chews with her mouth open and makes smacking sounds.  The resting position of her mouth often reveals her teeth, and her tense upper lip is noticeable. How can I improve her articulation as well as her looks and eating habits? Your client needs a program of orofacial myology…