Tag: Toys

Following Sanitary Procedures

By Pam Marshalla

Q: Recently I came across an SLP who was using oral-motor tools but not following sanitary procedures. Ahhhhhh! What resources can I share with her? SLPs must follow sanitary procedures at all times when touching a client in, on, or around the mouth with the hands or other objects. The following notes are from my upcoming book, The Marshalla Guide. Sanitizing the Hands Wash the hands with a sanitizing soap. Dry the hands with a paper towel and dispose of…

Mirror Play for Breath Work

By Pam Marshalla

Q: I have discovered that a mirror helps my young clients understand the idea of breath support for speech. Kids notice that their breath makes a fog on a mirror. I teach them to make longer and longer exhalations to make more and more fog and then they draw smiley faces in the fog on the mirror. Fun! Can you comment? My reading of historic artic books has revealed to me that we all end up developing the same methods…

Do Apps Interfere With Speech Therapy?

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I want to get your feedback on my experience with speech apps. I am a seasoned professional and I work the old fashioned way –– with toys, games, books, drawing, coloring, etc.. But I have grad student interns who work with me and I always have them show me what they do in therapy with their iPads. At first I was excited (and envious), but then I noticed the kids were engaged with and pressing the screens, but they…

Low Tone and Speech Therapy

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My client has low tone and many deviant phonological processes. Is this common? Does this mean he has dysarthria? How should my treatment look different from traditional articulation or phonological therapy? Yes!  If the child has hypotonia then this is dysarthria.  Whenever you have muscle tone problems of a global nature, then dysarthria is the diagnosis.  Dysarthria is a speech movement problem that is the result of muscle tone disturbance. (See definitions below) It is common for children with…

Making Speech Targets Salient – Classic Auditory Training – Tools for Amplifying Speech

By Shanti McGinley

This opinion paper was originally posted as a downloadable PDF on my websiteresources page. I am slowly formatting the articles over there for posting to this blog. This post was authored in September 2011. Download the original PDF here. *** Making Speech Targets Salient Classic Auditory Training Tools for Amplifying Speech By Pam Marshalla, MA, CCC-SLP Speech-Language Pathologist Making Speech Targets Salient One of the most important things we do in articulation therapy is to make speech units stand out so…

The Tools of Articulation Training

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I am confused over the term NS-OME (Non Speech Oral Motor Exercises). Some people are saying that we cannot use things like toothettes, bite sticks, whistles, or straws in therapy. I use many things like this in therapy. Shouldn’t we do whatever we can to help our clients learn to make speech sounds? Your question is a good one.  Yes, we are supposed to use whatever we can to help our clients learn to produce speech sounds.  Van Riper…

Sanitizing the Tools of Articulation Therapy

By Shanti McGinley

Q: We are wondering about hygiene and the use of tools in articulation therapy. What are the practices you use to keep your multiple-use tools sanitary from client to client? Guidelines Adhere to the following sanitary guidelines when handling objects that are used in, on, or around the mouth: Wood, paper, cardboard, sponge, cotton, leather, or hemp objects should be used once and then discarded. Dental floss also should be used once and then discarded. Plastic, rubber, vinyl, metal, and…

Exhaling Appropriately During Speech

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My inattentive three-year-old client suddenly has begun talking on both exhalation and inhalation. Do you have any suggestions to promote proper breathing for speech? The airflow toys can help teach young children all about the direction of airflow. These include horns, whistles, kazoos, harmonicas, sirens, and spirometers. A toy that works upon exhalation only (horn, whistle) can teach a child about moving air outward. Teach him “Blow out.”  (These toys will not sound when inhaled.) A toy that works…

Encouraging a “Real” Voice Instead of a Whisper

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My preschool client uses a whisper instead of a “real voice” when he talks. We are using PECS with him, and he can build sentences up to 5 words. Do you have suggestions for developing his voice? First, he needs to be seen by a physician – an ENT – to determine if there is a medical reason for his lack of voice: nodules, polyps, paralysis, malformation, etc.. You need this so you know what you are working with….

Sound-Activated Toys

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I was listening to your audio tape called Apraxia Uncovered and heard you say that voice-activated toys are great for getting children to vocalize. Where can I find these? I know of no speech company that is selling these toys now, but I searched online and found many for sale at various venues. Some are overpriced, but if you take the time to look around online, I am sure you will find at least one at a reasonable price….