Month: May 2012

Sloppy Sh with Puffy Cheeks

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My student is unable to produce the Sh sound and it sounds very slushy.  When he tries to say the sound, I noticed that he puffs up his cheeks with air. How can I get him to not do this and make that air flow come out the front? Here is what Nemoy and Davis (1937) would have done–– Have him make a Long E–– “Eeeeeeeee.” Make it be a strong, exaggerated, very smiley, and prolonged E. Super-exaggerate it….

My Heros in the SLP Profession

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I heard you say that Van Riper was your greatest hero of all time in the profession, but then you said you had others that you didn’t mention. Who else do you admire in the field? What an interesting question! Okay, here are the people that have been the most influential to me, presented in categories that are the most important to my work. Articulation The one-and-only Charles Van Riper wins this top place of honor because he is…

Differentiating Articulation, Phonology, and Oral Motor

By Shanti McGinley

Q: I still don’t get how to explain the difference between “articulation” and “phonology” and “oral motor.” Can you take a run at that again? I think my last answer to this was way too involved. Here is the short and sweet of it using phoneme M as an example in a very simplified way: Articulation ARTICULATION concerns the mechanics of sound production: The position assumed by the jaw, lips, tongue, and velum during production of a phoneme. For example, the…

Why Rag on the EBP?

By Shanti McGinley

Q: Why do you keep harping on about the evidence-based practice (EBP)? I keep “harping on” about the EBP for four main reasons: Because therapists from all over the world continue to submit questions to me about the EBP. Because therapists in my seminars continue to tell me about the problems they are having with the EBP––problems they are having with certain colleagues, administrators, or parents because of it. Because therapists in my seminars continue to tell me that they…

Tapping the Tongue to Stimulate the Lingua-alveolars––T, D, N, L

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My client backs every lingua-alveolar phoneme. He can do a rudimentary L once in a while, but he substitutes k/t, g/d, and ng/n all the time. What can I do? You probably are trying to get your client to elevate the tongue-tip to learn T, D, N, and L. This is to assume that the child can be taught to produce these sounds in the adult form. You have to revert back to teaching your client how to produce…

Outgrow jaw instability?

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My four-year-old client has apraxia and jaw instability. The mom wants to know if jaw stability will improve on its own. There is no way to know that. Certainly jaw stability improves with time, but it may not improve in this child without help. He is developing oral motor patterns that may stay with him until he receives therapy to change them. He should have jaw stability by now, so the question is, why doesn’t he? Whatever is preventing…

Lateral Lisp, Missing Teeth, and Malocclusion

By Shanti McGinley

Q: My client has no incisors and an underbite, and she distorts both S and Z. These errors sound like a lateral lisp, however when I use your straw testing method, there is no airflow coming out the sides, only the front. My colleague tells me that this is a lateral lisp. But how can it be if the air doesn’t come out the sides? Your colleague is wrong: If the airstream is not coming out the sides (as tested…

Frequency of Therapy

By Shanti McGinley

Q: How often do you see your clients? I always set once per week as my “must have” level. That is unless they are only on consult, follow-up, or the later stages of carryover. Over 35 years, I have found that once per week is sufficient for most kids, both the easy kids and the low functioning ones. Easy kids can do perfectly well with once per week, and low functioning clients do not move fast enough to warrant more…