Tracheal Stop: Learning the “Place of Articulation”

By Pam Marshalla

RT, just 3-year-old #7Q: My nearly 3-year-old client makes a substitution for /k/ which comes from the throat. The closest I have found online is to describe it as a uvular stop. Have you heard this substitution before and how would you describe it. Any thoughts on how to treat it?

Infants start out by making stops and fricatives all along the vocal track from anterior to posterior —

  • Bi-labial
  • Labial-dental
  • Lingual-labial
  • Lingual-dental
  • Lingual-alveolar
  • Lingual-velar
  • Tracheal
  • Glottal

Then they learn to restrict what whey need to use for English.

Your client is still simply using too making of them.

She is stopping and fricating airflow all along the vocal tract instead of just selecting those places we use in English. Certain places we use, others we don’t.

I have my clients practice ALL of them so they can learn PLACE of articulation.

Have him practice all of them so that he can learn the places by the tactile sensation, not just the auditory ones.

Compare and contrast them. E.g. produce “car” with a bi-labial stop, a lingua-dental stop, a velar stop, and a tracheal stop. Talk about which one is the one mommy uses.

2 thoughts on “Tracheal Stop: Learning the “Place of Articulation””

  1. Is this any different from a glotral stop that is a common substitution in children with cleft palates?

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